On December 16, 2013, Argentina’s Administración Federal de Ingresos Públicos (AFIP) published General Resolution 3571/13 – a regulation which lists the industry sectors which must transition to an electronic billing system regulated by the AFIP. Six industry sectors were included in the General Resolution 3571/13, including public services, energy suppliers, water suppliers, and construction, with different dates set for when each industry sector has to comply with the new regulations.

Six industry sectors were included in the General Resolution 3571/13 – including public services, energy suppliers, water suppliers, and construction – with different dates set for when each industry sector has to comply with the new regulations ( the latest date for compliance is August 1, 2014).

The changes will affect most accounts payable organizations, and from a legislative and implementation perspective, organizations should be aware of the following:
• There are multiple “types” of invoices depending on whether the invoice is for the final consumer, is a business to business transaction, or is an export invoice. There are different web services and XML schema for each e-factura type, along with PDF and barcode formats.
• The supplier must make the XML available to the buyer within 10 days of the supplier receiving the Codigo de Autorizacion de Impresion (CAE) number, which is an electronic authorization code issued (by email) by AFIP. For goods invoices, the CAE approval codes should be received by your supplier prior to releasing the goods based on the strictest interpretation of the laws.
• Please note that if the information is not exactly the way the AFIP regulations demand, the invoice will fail. This becomes very important if you are a sender of e-facturas in Argentina, and “Dynamic Sequencing” factors within your IT architecture. You will want to design your invoicing software so that invoices re-sequence if one fails validation.

Problems occur with the electronic billing system introduced in Argentina when you still deal with paper-based suppliers who have not been mandated by the AFIP. Unlike Brazil and Mexico, where you can expect 95% to 98% percent of your invoices to be processed electronically, there will still be a high proportion (for most PCOs) of scenarios in which the new AFIP mandate does not apply.

As you consider electronic invoicing in Argentina, make sure you have an up-to-date source of information on the ever-changing requirements and the capabilities of your suppliers.